Some important points before sitting for the SAT & ACT

No matter the length of your SAT and ACT preparation plan and your confidence level, the last week before your exam or test date can be nerve-racking. To more difficult matters, relying on the same review plan and study techniques during this week can negatively impact your performance on the SAT and the ACT. This time is an opportunity to refresh and review, not to learn new topics.

Here are some tips to maximize your last week:

  1. Familiarize yourself with the logistics of the exam: Note the directions on practice exams and ensure you completely understand them. Basically skimming them on your test day can save you important test-taking period.

It is also sensible to fine-tune your pacing. Be sure you know how much time you should spend on the various problems or questions in each part. This information should be second nature to you come test day.

  1. Review basic math skills: Math problems on the ACT, and in specific on the SAT, are less about what you know and more about how you apply what you know. The best way to solve difficult math problems is to evaluate what section of mathematical knowledge is central to the questions. The finest way to do so consistently is to analysis your basic math skills, even the ones you do not think you need to study.
  2. Study unfamiliar vocabulary: Just as polishing your basic math skills can potentially increase your grade, so too can review vocabulary words. Many queries in the critical reading part boil down to simply knowing what every word means. Devoting some hours to your vocabulary flashcards can help you immeasurably on exam day.
  3. Complete at least one more practice test: Set aside time for at least one more full-length practice exam and do it under test conditions. In the week before your exam, it is important to train your body and your mind to excel in the atmosphere of the SAT and the ACT.

You must acclimate to the pacing and length of the test and be familiar with things like how frequent your breaks will be and how long you have to complete each part. The only hurdle that should stand between you and a better grade is the exam contents itself, not its length and format.

  1. Review your incorrect answers: One of the most efficient uses of your time in the week before taking the SAT and the ACT is to revisit your past practice tests. Make sure you know precisely where you erred on every problem that you solved incorrectly.

You should have already diagnosed your addressed and weaknesses those areas. Reviewing your practice exams is like a final sweep for any holes in your knowledge.

  1. Relax and rest: No matter how much you prepare for your test, your hard work will be for naught if you are a nervous and sleep-deprived wreck on exam day. Acquire a full night’s sleep not only the evening before the test, but also in the two and three nights prior. In addition, the day before your test should be a relatively light review day. On your exam date, memorize to stay calm and relax.

If you follow these tips during the week before your test date, you will be better able to relax, prepare your body and mind for the rigors of exam day, and effectively review any topic you might need to review. As enticing as it might be, it is important to avoid overworking during the week before the test. The best way to succeed on exam day is to take care of your self in the week leading up to it. Some other important tips and assistance get from internet. There are various sites are available which provide you SAT and ACT preparation like Expertsmind. You can visit these site and get instant help.

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